HORROR YOU MIGHT HAVE MISSED: THE PACK (2015)

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THE PACK (2015)

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Australian horror has couple Adam and Carla Wilson (Jack Campbell and Anna Lise Phillips from Animal Kingdom) living on a rural farm/veterinary clinic with their two children, Henry and teen daughter Sophie (Hamish Phillips and Katie Moore). They are having financial troubles and their property is close to foreclosure. That is the least of their worries, though, as the area has been plagued recently by attacks from a pack of vicious wild dogs. Their farm animals are being slaughtered and a nearby couple has been killed. As fate would have it one night, the pack turn their attention towards the Wilsons and puts the family in a fight for their lives with no one coming to help.

This is a decent enough thriller as written by Evan Randall Green and directed by Nick Robertson. Their is some nice suspense, especially in the tense last act, when the Wilsons are fighting against the predators at their door. There are some vicious mauling sequences which have some impact and one of the reasons things work as well as they do is that the Wilson family seem like a likable bunch and they earn audience sympathy. The directing is a bit laid back and there could have had a bit more intensity, but Robertson does the job suitably enough to keep one interested in how it’s all going to turn out. The story itself is nothing new, though the familiar trope of someone living in a secluded house still works for obvious reasons. The Pack themselves are adequately effective. They are a group of black dogs and look ominous and vicious enough. Director Robertson wisely doesn’t overexpose them, so when we do see them in bloody action, it has the intended impact and the animals themselves act appropriately nasty. They could have used a bit more personality and threat factor, but are just dogs when all is said and done. There is no real explanation to their sudden aggressiveness other than Carla’s theories based on her experience with animals and leaves it a bit ambiguous.

Our small cast do as well as did the canines. Jack Campbell is solid as farmer and father Adam. Obviously he fights for his family when threatened. Same can be said of Anna Lise Phillips who is strong as Carla, the veterinarian and mother who also fights tooth and nail to save her family. She has a down to earth sexiness that comes through and gives her added appeal. Hamish Phillips and pretty Katie Moore do fine as the Wilson kids. They avoid annoying children status and actually are quite resourceful when separated and have to fight for themselves. The young actors make it convincing.

Overall, this was an entertaining enough thriller. There was some nice tension and suspense and quite a bit of bloodshed here and there to add to the effectiveness. Nick Robertson’s direction is a bit laid back and there could have been more tension if the intensity was turned up a bit, but it is still suspenseful and entertaining. Nothing overly memorable, but a solid enough horror/thriller for a night on the couch.

-MonsterZero NJ

3 bad dogs.

pack rating

 

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HORROR YOU MIGHT HAVE MISSED: THE PACK aka LA MEUTE (2010)

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THE PACK aka LA MEUTE (2010)

(Remember, clicking the highlighted links brings you to other reviews and articles here at The Movie Madhouse!)

French horror The Pack (La Meute) proves that even in France, picking up a hitchhiker in a backwoods area can only lead to trouble. Young, pretty Charlotte (Émilie Dequenne of Brotherhood of the Wolf) is driving through a very rural area of the French countryside when she picks up hitchhiker, Max (Benjamin Biolay), to give herself some company after being accosted by a group of sleazy bikers. While she’s asleep, Max stops at a secluded truck stop run by a woman named La Spack (Yolande Moreau). It’s a strange little place and after another encounter with the biker gang, Max disappears. Charlotte goes looking for him and finds that not only is the young hitchhiker La Spack’s son, but she’s been set-up to be their prisoner…and what the duo have in store for her is beyond her wildest nightmares. The Pack needs to be fed and Charlotte might be their next meal.

Written and directed by Franck Richard, The Pack is a gruesome, disturbing and sometimes very effective, if not familiar, little horror. It’s got a cool visual style, some well-orchestrated gore and effectively creepy title creatures. Sure, we have seen these elements before and the basic story of a traveler getting involved in some backwoods horror is quite common, but Richard does present it fairly well. Our creatures are not directly explained, nor is La Spack’s need to feed them, though it is implied that something strange occurred in a mine where her sons were killed….or were they transformed into something unearthly? It’s not spelled out and that may frustrate some, but there is enough there for one to come to their own conclusions and at the very least, feeding them keeps them away from her and her son. There is also a sub-plot about a retired cop (Philippe Nahon) poking his nose around La Spack’s truck stop in relation to the missing Charlotte, but we all know how story threads like that get wound up. This is not a great or original flick, nor is it really scary or overly suspenseful, but it does work on a basic level and the atmosphere is aided by an effective score by Chris Spencer and Ari Benjamin Meyers and there is some moody cinematography by Laurent Barès. Not everything works…like the biker gang showing up conveniently three times, or that no one has noticed the disappearances in the area…or the monsters, for that matter…but it is an entertaining flick from the French horror renaissance of the first decade of the 2000s.

The cast are serviceable. Émilie Dequenne makes for a strong-willed and defiant heroine. Her tattooed, leather jacket wearing Charlotte is a far cry from the proper noble woman she played in Brotherhood of the Wolf. She’s a fighter and an asskicker here and there are hints that she is running away from an old life/relationship and trying to start anew. Moreau is effective as the sort of cross between Leatherface and the Sawyer family patriarch from Chainsaw Massacre. Her motives aren’t 100% clear as to her killing innocents to feed The Pack, but there is something a bit maternal about it and we wonder if her sons weren’t killed, but the deaths are a cover-up for some sort of transformation from miner to monster. That being the case, one wonders why it was covered up, yet nothing done about the monster population in the area. Back to the cast, Biolay is fine as the soft spoken Max, who takes a liking to he and his mom’s latest victim and Nahon makes for a good ex-cop who can’t let old habits drop. A decent cast.

The Pack isn’t a great movie from a country that has made some surprisingly good horrors during the last decade or so. The story elements are very familiar and there are certain plot ambiguities concerning our title creatures. Are they monsters unleashed from the bowls of the earth, or men transformed by something they unearthed? Who knows? It is an effective little flick, though and definitely passes the bloody time for a lazy horror filled Saturday night on the couch.

-MonsterZero NJ

3 Pack members.

la meute rating

 

 

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