BARE BONES: THE TALL MAN (2012)

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THE TALL MAN (2012)

Pascal Laugier’s Martyrs was a brutal, shocking, visceral horror that grabbed the horror film community by the balls when released in 2008. Laugier returned to the writer/director’s chair in 2012 with The Tall Man and while it’s nowhere near as brutal or horrifying as his previous flick, Tall Man shows Laugier is a skilled filmmaker that can turn the tables on you and surprise you at will. He makes you think your watching something and that you know exactly what’s going on…then proves just how wrong you are.

The story here begins in the desolate, rural town of Cold Rock, WA., a dying town where the children are disappearing at an alarming rate and a supernatural figure known as The Tall Man is held responsible. A recently widowed doctor (a mesmerizing performance by Jessica Biel) is suddenly thrust in the middle of this urban legend when her son is abducted in the middle of the night. To say anymore would be to ruin a really intense viewing where the rug is pulled out from under you many times and you won’t see it coming. Yes, it’s more of a thriller than a horror film, but Laugier keeps you guessing and keeps you surprised and gives us something quite different, but no less effective, than his 2008 shocker. Laugier is no fluke. Highly recommended.

-MonsterZero NJ

three and one half stars rating

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BARE BONES: LEGEND

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LEGEND (2015)

Legend is based on the true-life story of twins Ronald and Reggie Kray (both Tom Hardy) who ruled London’s criminal underworld during the 60s. The film focuses on the relationship between Reggie and his wife Frances (Emily Browning), who narrates the film. It starts with Ron’s release from a psychiatric hospital, the twins’ rise to power and then to their eventual downfall as their behavior spirals out of control and they both commit acts they can’t hide from. The film is based on the book The Profession of Violence: The Rise and Fall of the Kray Twins by John Pearson.

With a clever script and some stylish direction from Brian Helgeland, we get a film that is very entertaining in that it has a slightly eccentric slant much like it’s subjects. It has the elements of traditional crime dramas like it, but gives it an offbeat and subtle humor and doesn’t shy away from untraditional elements such as Ron’s open homosexuality (in real-life he was a proclaimed bi-sexual) and his tendency for very strange business threatening decisions. The film can be violent at times, obviously, but uses it sparingly and with impact, as opposed to some American Mafia films which revel in it for it’s own sake. What really makes this film work, though, is the tour de force performance by Tom Hardy as both Krays. He gives both brothers their own individual, vivid personalities and creates dynamic portrayals as each of the two. He is fascinating to watch and it really elevates the film, not that it wasn’t already worth watching. Hardy is proving to be one of the best actors around today. A very enjoyable gangster epic with it’s  refreshingly own style and a fantastic performance by it’s leading man in a dual role. Also stars Christopher Eccleston (Thor: The Dark World), David Thewliss and Chazz Palminteri as Angelo Bruno, an associate of American gangster Meyer Lansky, who is interested in doing business with the brothers.

-MonsterZero NJ

three and one half stars rating

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TOMB OF NOSTALGIA: LEGEND: DIRECTOR’S CUT (1985)

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LEGEND: DIRECTOR’S CUT (1985)

In 1985 when Ridley Scott tested the 113 minute cut of his fantasy epic Legend, it didn’t test well with audiences and it was deemed that it took far too long to get to the action. The film American audiences finally saw was 89 minutes but, the film was a box office failure anyway. Now the film has been restored to Scott’s original 113 minute cut and has been beautifully presented on blu-ray for fans to finally see the film Scott intended. But, is it a better film then what I originally saw in a theater in 1985? I think so. I will agree it does take a lot longer to get to the questing and rescuing but, a lot of the fairy tale elements and atmosphere have been restored with this edition of these removed sequences and a lot more story and character interaction does enrich the film and make it less a music video and more a fantasy film. The restoring of Jerry Goldsmith’s score also changes the atmosphere and gives it more of an epic fantasy feeling. I like Tangerine Dream’s work on the theatrical cut, but, it does give it more of the before mentioned music video vibe. Remember MTV was still new and a big thing when this was released so, I wouldn’t doubt that was what they were going for. Legend tells the story of lone woodsman Jack (Tom Cruise) who is trying to woo a princess named Lili (Mia Sara). He decides to take her to see the last pair of unicorns whose magic keeps the sun rising and good and light in this fantasy world. But, the evil Lord Of Darkness (Tim Curry) plans to destroy the unicorns and bathe the world in darkness so he and his minions may rule. When the unicorns are distracted by the innocence of virginal Lili, one is poisoned and it’s horn stolen by Darkness’ goblins. Soon they capture the last remaining unicorn and Lili as well and Darkness plans to kill the magical animal and wed the girl. Now it is up to Jack and an assortment of Wood Elves, Brownies and Fairies to rescue Lili and save the unicorn from within Darkness’ lair. Whether it’s the director’s cut or theatrical cut, Legend is an amazingly beautiful and sumptuous visual fantasy feast under Ridely Scott’s lens. The visuals are stunning and without benefit of CGI and they, even by today’s high-tech standards, are breathtaking. There is plenty of action and a lot of strange creatures both good and bad and all rendered with some fantastic make-up FX from The Thing’s Rob Bottin. Tim Curry’s Darkness has become an iconic character and is truly remarkable to see. Again, no CGI. As for the acting, Cruise and Sara are fine but, it was early in both careers and the performances are not as strong as they would be today, now that both are veterans. Curry on the other hand, radiates both evil and malicious charm through the layers of latex and even though he looks completely inhuman on the outside, he gives the Dark Lord a vivid personality and makes him a threatening villain worthy of such an epic fantasy film. Overall, we have a lot more moments with all these characters together with the expanded cut. To me it adds a richness to the film that wasn’t there in the theatrical version, especially in Jack and Lili’s relationship, their feelings for each other are far more explored and we get a better idea of why Jack risks so much for her. I feel this Legend is far more a fairy tale in this version then fantasy themed action movie and like Jackson’s Lord Of The Rings films decades later, it’s worth sitting through more of these little moments to emotionally enrich the film as it only gives the action scenes more depth. I still think the theatrical cut has it’s merits as a fun, breezy 90 minutes of fantasy action but, if you want more depth and don’t mind spending a bit more time reveling in Ridley Scott’s beautiful fantasy world, then the director’s cut is for you.

3 and 1/2 Lords of Darkness!

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